Local Architects and Students Light up the Night at October Gainesville Artwalk

AIA pumpkin by Maria Luisa Riviere Students of architecture and members of the local architectural community participated in downtown Gainesville’s Artwalk on Friday, October 25 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. They showcased the creative side of their architecture. “It’s an opportunity for us both to show the artistic component of what we do,” said Ron Haase, a board member for the American Institute of Architects Gainesville Chapter.

For this exhibit, “Light up the Night,” six University of Florida architecture students presented conceptual models of studio design projects in a variety of mediums including paper, wood, bass wood, and illustration boards. Also in the exhibition, Gainesville architects presented their painting, sculptural, photographic, and wood-working skills. Haase said many of the members were eager to show people they do more than design buildings. “Architects have another side of their personalities. Many are true artists,” Haase said.

Melrose Volunteer Fire Department painting by Ron HaaseThe event took place at 315 SE Second Ave., which is the new headquarters of the American Institute of Architects Gainesville Chapter. Andres Camacho, a 20-year-old UF architecture junior, said creativity is essential to what architects do. “Architecture itself is a form of art,” said Camacho, president of the UF student chapter of American Institute of Architects. Camacho presented a project he created for class that focuses on the vertical structure of buildings. “Using your creative side in architecture is essential,” he said.

Watercolor painting by Mick Richmond Student work Chandler Rozear with Student Bre and Son ChrisMobile by Chandler RozearWoodworking piece by Jim VignolaRon and Jan Haase with Student"A Three Weapon Glove" drawing by Bill WarinnerMoonlight buildings pumpkin by Michele BorstStudent conceptual design

AIA Gainesville has 2 “Top 100″ Buildings

Baughman Center at the University of Florida (John Zona)Baughman1 Mandi's Chapel3SWeaving Images 023This year, to celebrate it’s 100th Anniversary, AIA Florida initiated a statewide, online competition to choose among Florida’s favorite buildings. The competition was called “Florida Architecture: 100 Years 100 Places.”  AIA Florida’s local chapters initially nominated many buildings – and  a panel of architects narrowed the list down to a top 100. Voting was open to the public from March 13 through April 6.  AIA Florida also recognized the top building in 13 different categories, including performing arts, museum, and residential projects.  The basic intent of the competition was to bring  an awareness of architecture (and architects) to the general public.

The response was wildly successful; over 2.4 million votes were cast. On April 18, AIA Florida announced the top five winners at the  Fontainebleau Miami Beach Hotel ( designed by Morris Lapidus, and originally opened in 1954) which took first place in the competition. The next five winners are:

Second place: Mandi’s Chapel in Live Oak, Fla., designed by John Zona, AIA
Third place: The Baughman Center at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Fla., designed by John Zona, AIA
Fourth place: The University of North Florida Student Union in Jacksonville, Fla., designed by Rink Design Partnership
Fifth place: Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., designed by Marion Sims Wyeth

AIA Gainesville is thrilled that two of the top 100 buildings (Mandi’s Chapel and the Baughman Center) are within our area.  Don Yoshino, FAIA, the chairman of AIA Florida’s 100th Anniversary Committee, stated the success of this event best:  “We are elated that so many Floridians took the time to learn about the beautiful structures in their communities.”

 

City of Gainesville Beautification Awards

On April 25, 2012, the City of Gainesville handed out the following beautification awards:

Institutional Facilities:

1. A Nan Buddhist Temple -  Bob Taylor, AIA – Scherer Construction

2. Gainesville Fire Station 8 -  Bentley Architects & Engineers, Inc. (Longwood, FL)

3. Reichert House – William Brame, AIA,  Brame Architects

Commercial & Retail Businesses:

1. Fletcher Executive Center – Bob Taylor, AIA – Scherer Construction

2. Las Margaritas Mexican Restaurant – Ricardo Cavallino, AIA – Ricardo Cavallino & Associates

3. O!O Garden Grill – Andrew Kaplan, Architect

4. Shores Animal Hospital – Eugene Russell Davis, Architect

5.  Sunstate Federal Credit Union – John Donahue, AIA, Donahue Architecture

6. Wendy/Willy’s Mexican Grill – DVA Architecture (Gaithersburg, MD)

Apartments & Condominiums:

1.  Archstone – Mac MacLean, AIA, Jim Vignola, AIA – Skinner Vignola McLean Inc.

2. The Continuum – Design Collective (Durham, N.C.)

3. Deco ’39 – Mac MacLean, AIA, Jim Vignola, AIA – Skinner Vignola McLean Inc.

Restoration, Revitalizqtion & Adaptive Use:

1. America Accounting & Tax Co. – Ricardo Cavallino, AIA – Ricardo Cavallino & Associates

2. Almond’s Automotive – Stephen Bender, AIA

3. Porters Gardens Subdivision – Karson & Associates (Northbrook, IL)

Facade Improvement:

1. Blue Water Bay in downtown Gainesville – Eugene Russell Davis, Architect

2. O’Reilly Auto Parts – Craig Schneider, AIA (Springfield, MO)

Uniquely Gainesville:

1. Haile Homestead new Visitor’s Center – Bill Warinner, AIA – Aachen Designers

Outstanding Commercial:

1. CVS on SW 13th Street – Stefano de Luca Architectural Services (Hollywood, FL)

Outstanding Institutional:

1. Fine Arts Hall at Santa Fe College – Zeidler Partnership, Inc. (West Palm Beach, FL)

2. Florida Innovation Hub at UF – Jack Ponikvar, Ponikvar & Associates

3.  GRU Eastside Operations – Bentley Architects & Engineers, Inc. (Longwood, FL)

4. Malcolm Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center – Cedric Christian, AIA – Flad & Associates

5.  Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art – Kha Le-Huu (Orlando, FL)

Allied Memberships

AIA Gainesville has introduced a new opportunity for Allied Memberships in our Chapter, available for Businesses, Agencies and Individuals associated with the Architecture, Design & Construction communities.  For all of our many and supportive contacts in the North Florida area, an Allied Membership will provide these benefits:

  • Include your company name with a brief profile in our Allied Members listing on the AIA Gainesville chapter website.
  • Display your company logo on our sponsor’s sidebar banner of the chapter website.
  • Opportunities to network with local Members of AIA Gainesville, and attend local chapter events and continuing education seminars.
  • Opportunities for Sponsorship of AIA Gainesville Chapter events  ( upcoming 2012 events include the Annual Dinner, and Celebrate Design.

The cost for Allied Membership is $200.00 per year.  Memberships will run from January 1 to December 31 of a single year, and fees will be pro-rated appropriately for joining mid-year.

The cost for Sponsorship of an individual event is $200.00 as well.

Our chapter is committed to the success of this program as we look forward to building stronger relationships with our Allied Members and colleagues in the design / construction community.  We envision this as a helpful tool that will enhance the local support network for all of us!

Contact Bob Filippi:  rpfilippi@gmail.com

Kanapaha Botanical Gardens Visitor Center

Kanapaha Gardens Entry

The Summer House

Williston Church of God

wcog_4

Designed for a brand new site, this new worship facility will be 38,842 gsf.  The design for the Church needed to be very efficient so many shapes and arrangements were designed for the heart of the facility which is the main Sanctuary.  After many attempts the hexagon shape became the most efficient to the most seats, largest stage, and good acoustics required by the Church.  Each wing came off each side of the hexagon and has a unique function.  Each wing is designed at 60 foot width to match the 60 foot sides of the hexagon.  The two front wings are designed for expansion in the future.
The Sanctuary is designed for a 100 person choir and 500 fixed seats on a sloped floor.  The design incorporates the possibility of expanding the Sanctuary utilizing theater-style seating to add an additional 200 seats.
The budget was extremely tight so maximizing the square footage was essential using creative details and finishes to keep the cost down yet still represent excellence in design.